sábado, 23 de febrero de 2013

· "THE EARLY BEATLES" - The Beatles USA 1965

The Early Beatles is The Beatles' sixth release on Capitol Records, and their eighth album for the American market. The album resembles more of an early compilation because all of the tracks had previously been featured on the early 1964 Vee-Jay release Introducing... The Beatles. The front cover photo for this album is the same as the back cover photo for the British LP Beatles For Sale. Vee-Jay had gained American rights to the tracks before the group became popular in America (because Capitol, the US division of EMI which owns The Beatles' record label Parlophone, had refused to release the group's records), and their releases had initially failed to chart. But after the group became popular, Vee-Jay, still having the rights to the early material, were able to re-release them in America and this time the records sold in the millions. Capitol tried to stop Vee Jay from releasing the tracks, but were not successful. In October 1964, Vee-Jay's license to distribute the Beatles recordings they possessed expired, so Capitol were finally able to get the American distribution rights for the album. Though Vee-Jay had compiled four Beatles albums in the space of just fifteen months from these sessions (all of which charted), when released on Capitol, the album still sold, but its highest chart position was only number 43, thus making it the only original Capitol or United Artists released Beatles album not to reach numbers 1 or 2 (with the exception of the Capitol documentary album, The Beatles' Story which peaked at number 7). Capitol did little to promote the album since the label merely viewed it as a replacement for the Vee-Jay LP, rather than a "new" Beatles album. The Early Beatles sold one million copies by late 1973 and was certified Gold by the RIAA on 8 January 1974. It was released in both mono and stereo versions. As no stereo masters of "Love Me Do" and "P.S. I Love You" exist, Capitol used EMI's duophonic mixes of both songs. There was also some added echo and reverb to "Twist And Shout". This album is available on compact disc as part of The Capitol Albums, Volume 2 box set, in both mono and stereo, although the mono album mix appears to be strictly a stereo-to-mono fold-down; the song "Please Please Me" features the lyric slip-up and layering in the last verse, as issued on the stereo release and on the original stereo UK album Please Please Me. The album includes eleven of the fourteen tracks from the group's first British LP Please Please Me. Tracks not included are: "I Saw Her Standing There" (issued on Meet the Beatles!), "Misery" and "There's a Place". The latter two tracks, first issued by Capitol in 1965 on "Starline" singles, would finally get a Capitol LP release in 1980 in the American version of the Rarities album. Two other tracks originally released by Vee-Jay in America but also not included in this album were "From Me to You" (which wasn't released on an LP in America until 1973 on the compilation 1962–1966) and "Thank You Girl" (which Capitol had already released on the LP The Beatles' Second Album).


01- Love Me Do
02- Twist and Shout
03- Anna (Go to Him)
04- Chains
05- Boys
06- Ask Me Why
07- Please Please Me
08- P.S. I Love You
09- Baby, It's You
10- A Taste of Honey
11- Do You Want to Know a Secret?

· "BEATLES FOR SALE" (Argentinian LP)

Recording first published:
Mono, 29 January 1965
Stereo, 5 March 1965

 Photobucket

· "BEATLES 65" - The Beatles USA 1964

Beatles '65 is The Beatles' fifth Capitol release, but seventh American album. It was released in mono and stereo versions. Beatles '65 includes eight of the fourteen songs from Beatles for Sale (omitting "Eight Days a Week", "Words of Love", "Every Little Thing", "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party", "What You're Doing", and the "Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey" medley, all of which showed up later in Beatles VI). It picked up "I'll Be Back" from the UK A Hard Day's Night and also includes the single "I Feel Fine"/"She's a Woman". These latter two songs were remixed into "duophonic" [fake] stereo and drenched in reverb by Capitol Records' executive Dave Dexter, Jr. to cover up the use of the mono mixes sent from England. The mono versions of both "I Feel Fine" and "She's A Woman" were also remixed with added echo and reverb for the single and mono album release. The stereo version of "Mr. Moonlight" has a longer fadeout than the UK versions. In the US the album was a blockbuster hit, and jumped from number 98 straight to number 1, making the biggest jump to the top position in the history of the Billboard Album Charts up to that time. It remained at number 1 for nine straight weeks, starting on 9 January 1965. In what may be testament to the overwhelming market appeal of the Beatles, several albums were released and promoted in America during 1965 sporting a similar title. These included Sinatra '65 by Frank Sinatra and Ellington '65 by Duke Ellington on Reprise Records, Trio '65 by jazz pianist Bill Evans on Verve Records, and Brasil '65 by Sérgio Mendes on the Beatles' own Capitol label. This album was also issued in Germany on the Odeon label. On 16 November 2004, this album was released on CD for the first time as part of The Capitol Albums, Volume 1 box set.

Photobucket



01- No Reply
02- I'm a Loser
03- Baby's in Black
04- Rock and Roll Music
05- I'll Follow the Sun
06- Mr. Moonlight
07- Honey Don't
08- I'll Be Back
09- She's a Woman
10- I Feel Fine
11- Everybody's Trying to Be my Baby

· "BEATLES FOR SALE" LP stereo

Another LP that I think sounds far better on its stereo version.
Opinions?

Photobucket

video


01- No Reply
02- I'm A Loser
03- Baby's In Black
04- Rock and Roll Music
05- I'll Follow The Sun
06- Mr. Moonlight
07- Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey
08- Eight Days A Week
09- Words Of Love
10- Honey Don't
11- Every Little Thing
12- I Don't Want To Spoil The Party
13- What You're Doing
14- Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby

· "BEATLES FOR SALE" LP mono

Beatles For Sale is The Beatles' fourth album, released in late 1964. The album marked a minor turning point in the evolution of Lennon and McCartney as lyricists, Lennon particularly now showing interest in composing songs of a more autobiographical nature as "I'm a Loser", which shows Lennon for the first time seemingly coming under the influence of Bob Dylan, having met him for the first time in New York while on their North American summer tour on 28 August 1964.

Photobucket

video


01- No Reply
02- I'm A Loser
03- Baby's In Black
04- Rock and Roll Music
05- I'll Follow The Sun
06- Mr. Moonlight
07- Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey
08- Eight Days A Week
09- Words Of Love
10- Honey Don't
11- Every Little Thing
12- I Don't Want To Spoil The Party
13- What You're Doing
14- Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby

· "BEATLES FOR SALE" LP recording sessions

During the summer of 1964, prior their longest North American tour, the group started to work on their fourth LP, which would be finished by the end of the year and released just in time for Christmas sales...

Photobucket




01- Baby's in Black (take 7 - studio chat)
02- Baby's in Black (Paul 3d voice - frag.)
03- I’m a Loser (take 1)
04- I’m a Loser (take 2)
05- I’m a Loser (take 3)
06- I’m a Loser (take 4)
07- I’m a Loser (take 5)
08- I’m a Loser (take 6)
09- I’m a Loser (take 7)
10- I’m a Loser (take 8)
11- Mr. Moonlight (take 1)
12- Mr. Moonlight (take 2 - partial)
13- Mr. Moonlight (take 4)
14- Leave My Kitten Alone (take 4)
15- Leave My Kitten Alone (take 5 - stereo mix)
16- Every Little Thing (take 4)
17- What You're Doing (take 11)
18- No Reply (take 1)
19- No Reply (take 2)
20- No Reply (Unknown take - studio chat)
21- No Reply (take 8)
22- Eight Days a Week (take 1 + 2)
23- Eight Days a Week (take 4)
24- Eight Days a Week (take 5)
25- She’s a Woman (take 1)
26- She’s a Woman (take 2)
27- She’s a Woman (take 3)
28- She’s a Woman (take 4)
29- She’s a Woman (take 5)
30- She’s a Woman (take 6)
31- Eight Days a Week (take 15)
32- Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey (take 2)
33- I Feel Fine (take 1)
34- I Feel Fine (take 2)
35- I Feel Fine (take 5)
36- I Feel Fine (take 6)
37- I Feel Fine (take 7)
38- I Feel Fine (take 8)
39- I Feel Fine (take 9)
40- I Feel Fine (take 9 with vocals)
41- What You're Doing (remake - take 5)
42- Leave My Kitten Alone (mono mix from take 5)
43- Studio chat (possibly from the Honey Don't  session)
44- Honey Don't (probably an out-fake)

domingo, 17 de febrero de 2013

·"LIVE AT THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL 1964" (Aborted album) - The Beatles

On February 12, 1964 Capitol Records considered recording The Beatles' concert at Carnegie Hall in New York, but at last minute they could not obtain the necessary approval from the Musicians Union to record the performance. Six months later, Bob Eubanks booked The Beatles' August 23, 1964 performance at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles where Capitol did record their performance with the intent of releasing a live album at least in America. Only four days after the concert (on 27 August 1964) the recording was mixed by Capitol Records’ producer Voyle Gilmore and balance engineer Hugh Davies. On September 3 an acetate was cut, and on September 16 that acetate containing the intended commercial release was sent to the Beatles. Brian Epstein, George Martin and the Beatles themselves were not fully satisfied with the results considering it was inadequate for a commercial release due to the sound quality of the recording, and the project was stopped. Capitol, however, utilized a 48-second excerpt of "Twist & Shout" from that 1964 Hollywood Bowl concert on the 1964 documentary double album, The Beatles' Story. In 1969 the original master tape was sent to Abbey Road, in London, and thirteen years later of being recorded (and after being properly filtered, equalized, and edited this time by George Martin) half of this concert was finally released as part of the LP The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl, album which for some unknown reason remains unreleased on CD until this day. Here you’ll be able to add to your collection that original mono mix for the 1964 acetate, plus the original stereo unedited master tape of the same concert. Enjoy it!

Photobucket



Original acetate mono mix:
01 - Twist & Shout
02 - You Can’t Do That
03 - All My Loving
04 - She Loves You
05 - Things We Said Today
06 - Roll Over Beethoven
07 - Can't Buy Love
08 - If I Fell
09 - I Want To Hold Your Hand
10 - Boys
11 - A Hard Day’s Night
12 - Long Tall Sally

Original stereo master tape:
13 - Introduction
14 - Twist & Shout
15 - You Can’t Do That
16 - All My Loving
17 - She Loves You
18 - Things We Said Today
19 - Roll Over Beethoven
20 - Can't Buy Love
21 - If I Fell
22 - I Want To Hold Your Hand
23 - Boys
24 - A Hard Day’s Night
25 - Long Tall Sally

· "THE BEATLES' STORY" - The Beatles USA 1964

The Beatles' Story a documentary double album featuring interviews, press conferences, and songs by The Beatles. It was the Beatles' fourth release by Capitol and sixth American album, released in both mono and stereo. The LP was also released in Canada. Capitol released this album shortly after competitor Vee-Jay Records released Hear The Beatles Tell All. The album contains brief stereo excerpts of their 1964 Hollywood Bowl concert, which was unreleased until May 1977 on The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl. Several voice overs dominate the rest of the record. The album entered the Billboard Top LP's chart on 12 December at number 97. On 2 January 1965, the album reached its peak position at number seven, where it remained for four weeks before beginning its slide down the charts. Cash Box entered the album at number seven, whereas Record World showed the record peaking at number 13. Although not a million-seller, the album was certified gold, signifying sales in excess of one million dollars, in its first week; a very respectable showing, considering that the album was little more than an elaborately packaged documentary record. In 1996, The Beatles' Story was being prepared for release on Digital Audio Tape (DAT), but when the format failed commercially, the plan was scrapped. As of 2011, it only has been issued in long-playing record and cassette, making this one of the few American Beatles albums that has yet to be officially reissued on CD or any other format.

Photobucket


01- On Stage With The Beatles
02- How Beatlemania Began
03- Beatlemania in Action
04- Man Behind the Beatles - Brian Epstein
05- John Lennon
06- Who's a Millionaire?
07- Beatles will be Beatles
08- Man Behind the Music - George Martin
09- George Harrison
10- A Hard Day's Night - Their First Movie
11- Paul McCartney
12- Sneaky Haircuts and More About Paul
13- The Beatles Look at Life
14- Victims' of Beatlemania
15- Beatle Medley
16- Ringo Starr
17- Liverpool and All the World!

·"ANOTHER TRACKS OF A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" (USA masters) - The Beatles

What about if Capitol had released the same album as Parlophone, but using their own masters?
Here's the result...

 photo sz-005-cover-copia_zpsdc87dd43.jpg

video


STEREO:
01- A Hard Day's Night (1962-1966)
02- I Should Have Known Better (Reel Music)
03- If I Fell (Something New)
04- I’m Happy Just To Dance With You (Something New)
05- And I Love Her (Something New)
06- Tell Me Why (Something New)
07- Can’t Buy Me Love (Hey Jude)
08- Anytime At All (Something New)
09- I’ll Cry Instead (Something New)
10- Things We Said Today (Something New)
11- When I Get Home (Something New)
12- You Can’t Do That (Rock & Roll Music)
13- I’ll Be Back (Beatles '65)

MONO:
14- A Hard Day's Night (A Hard Day's Night - UA)
15- I Should Have Known Better (A Hard Day's Night - UA)
16- If I Fell (Something New)
17- I’m Happy Just To Dance With You (Something New)
18- And I Love Her (Something New)
19- Tell Me Why (Something New)
20- Can’t Buy Me Love (A Hard Day's Night - UA)
21- Anytime At All (Something New)
22- I’ll Cry Instead (Something New)
23- Things We Said Today (Something New)
24- When I Get Home (Something New)
25- You Can’t Do That (The Beatles' Second Album)
26- I’ll Be Back (Beatles '65)

Bonus Tracks STEREO:
27- Long Tall Sally (The Beatles' Second Album)
28- I Call Your Name (The Beatles' Second Album)
29- Slow Down (Something New)
30- Matchbox (Something New)

Bonus Tracks MONO:
31- Long Tall Sally (The Beatles' Second Album)
32- I Call Your Name (The Beatles' Second Album)
33- Slow Down (Something New)
34- Matchbox (Something New)

· "¡YEAH, YEAH, YEAH, PAUL, JOHN, GEORGE Y RINGO!" (A Hard Day's Night Argentinian LP)

Recording first published:
Mono, 28 August 1964
Stereo, August 1972

Photobucket


· "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" UK LP stereo

This is the first Beatles album to be recorded on four-track tape, allowing for good stereo mixes...

Photobucket

video


01- A Hard Day's Night
02- I Should Have Known Better
03- If I Fell
04- I'm Happy Just To Dance With You
05- And I Love Her
06- Tell Me Why
07- Can't Buy Me Love
08- Any Time At All
09- I'll Cry Instead
10- Things We Said Today
11- When I Get Home
12- You Can't Do That
13- I'll Be Back

· "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" UK LP mono

While showcasing the development of the band's songwriting talents, the album sticks to the basic rock and roll instrumentation and song format. It is notable as the first Beatles album to feature entirely original compositions (and the only one with a song catalogue credited entirely to Lennon-McCartney). The album contains some of their most famous songs, including the title track (with its distinct, instantly recognizable opening chord) and "Can't Buy Me Love", both being transatlantic number one singles for the band. The album and film are said to portray the classic image of the Beatles, as it was released at the height of Beatlemania. George Harrison's resonant 12-string electric guitar leads were hugely influential; the movie helped persuade the Byrds, then folksingers, to plunge all out into rock & roll, and the Beatles (along with Bob Dylan) would be hugely influential on the folk-rock explosion of 1965. The Beatles' success, too, had begun to open the U.S. market for fellow Brits like the Rolling Stones, the Animals, and the Kinks, and inspired young American groups to mount a challenge of their own with self-penned material that owed a great debt to Lennon-McCartney. Side one of the LP contains the songs from the movie soundtrack. Side two contains songs written for, but not included in, the film. In 2000, Q magazine placed A Hard Day's Night at number 5 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 388 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Photobucket

video


01- A Hard Day's Night
02- I Should Have Known Better
03- If I Fell
04- I'm Happy Just to Dance With You
05- And I Love Her
06- Tell Me Why
07- Can't Buy Me Love
08- Anytime at All
09- I'll Cry Instead
10- Things We Said Today
11- When I Get Home
12- You Can't Do That
13- I'll Be Back

· "SOMETHING NEW" - The Beatles USA 1964

Something New is The Beatles' third Capitol LP release, but fifth American album following the United Artists release of A Hard Day's Night. This album includes eight songs from the original British release of A Hard Day's Night, as well as the remaining tracks "Slow Down" and "Matchbox" from the Long Tall Sally EP and the German release of "I Want to Hold Your Hand". It was released in mono and stereo, and all mono mixes of the five songs duplicated from the United Artists soundtrack album are the same. The mono release contains alternative versions of "Any Time At All" (different during the instrumental bridge), "I'll Cry Instead" (with the missing third verse), "When I Get Home" (the line "Till I walk out that door again" during the song's bridge has a different vocal passage from the UK mono mix), and "And I Love Her" (McCartney's non-double-tracked vocal). The album spent nine weeks at #2 on the Billboard 200, behind the United Artists A Hard Day's Night album. This album was also released on the Parlophone label for sale only on American Armed Forces bases in Europe. These copies have great collector value. The album was also issued in Germany on the Odeon label. The German stereo version contains a reprocessed stereo version of "Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand" and an extended version of "And I Love Her", repeating the closing riff six times instead of four. This mix was later released on the US version of Rarities. In 2004 this album was released for the first time on CD as part of The Capitol Albums, Volume 1 box set.

Photobucket




01- I'll Cry Instead
02- Things We Said Today
03- Any Time at All
04- When I Get Home
05- Slow Down
06- Matchbox
07- Tell Me Why
08- And I Love Her
09 I'm Happy Just to Dance with You
10- If I Fell
11- Komm, Gib Mir Deine Hand

· "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" - The Beatles USA 1964

A Hard Day's Night is the third studio album by The Beatles, released on 10 July 1964 as the soundtrack to their film "A Hard Day's Night". The American version of A Hard Day's Night was released on 26 June 1964 by United Artists Records in mono (UAL-3366) and (fake) stereo (UAS-6366) and contained only the seven songs from the film: "A Hard Day's Night", "Tell Me Why", "I'm Happy Just to Dance With You", "I Should Have Known Better", "If I Fell", "And I Love Her", and "Can't Buy Me Love". It also featured "I'll Cry Instead", which, although written for the film, was cut from it at the last minute. The American version also included four easy listening-styled instrumental versions of Lennon and McCartney songs by George Martin: "I Should Have Known Better", "And I Love Her", "Ringo's Theme (This Boy)", and "A Hard Day's Night". As with the Vee-Jay and Capitol albums issued during 1964, there are different label variations of the United Artists album, as well. Some of the labels misspell the titles of two of the songs: "Tell Me Why" appears as "Tell Me Who", and "I'll Cry Instead" as "I Cry Instead". The album went to number one on the Billboard album chart, spending 14 weeks there, the longest run of any album that year. After EMI acquired United Artists Records, this album was reissued on 17 August 1980 on the Capitol label (SW-11921). While the stereo version of the album included the instrumental tracks in true stereo, the Beatles' own recordings appeared as electronically rechannelled stereo recordings made from the mono releases. The 1980 Capitol Records release used the same master tape as the original United Artists stereo release, despite the availability of several tracks with official stereo remixes by that time. True stereo versions of most of the songs appeared on the Capitol Records album Something New, released in July 1964. "Can't Buy Me Love" and "I Should Have Known Better" finally appeared in stereo versions on the Apple Records compilation Hey Jude in 1970. And the song "A Hard Day's Night" did not appear in a stereo version in the US until the LP Reel Music in March 1982. In 2004, counterfeit copies of the United Artists album began appearing in foreign countries in a 40th anniversary edition on CD. This version features the same twelve songs in the same running order, but with all of the tracks appearing in true stereo together for the very first time - including the eight Beatles songs. This marks the first time that the full-length, true stereo version of "I'll Cry Instead" was released, since its original issue on the 1980 "Casualties" LP, tho' in fact was an edit of the stereo mix. The American version of A Hard Day's Night  has yet to be released officially on CD in the United States since it was eventually replaced by the original UK version with its first release on CD and LP re-release in 1987.

Photobucket


01- A Hard Day's Night
02- Tell Me Why
03- I'll Cry Instead
04- I Should Have Known Better (instrumental)
05- I'm Happy Just to Dance With You
06- And I Love Her (instrumental)
07- I Should Have Known Better
08- If I Fell
09- And I Love Her
10- Ringo's Theme [This Boy] (instrumental)
11-Can't Buy Me Love
12- A Hard Day's Night (instrumental)

· "THE BEATLES' SECOND ALBUM" - The Beatles USA 1964

The Beatles' Second Album is The Beatles' second Capitol Records album, and their third album released in the United States including Introducing... The Beatles released three months earlier on Vee-Jay Records. The Beatles' Second Album went to number 1 on the album charts in the US, knocking off Meet the Beatles!, the first time an artist replaced itself at number one on the US album charts. Unlike the contemporaneous British Beatles albums, The Beatles' Second Album is composed exclusively of uptempo numbers, and for this reason is a favourite of some Beatles aficionados and rock critics. "The Beatles' Second Album stands as probably best pure rock & roll album ever issued of the group's music" [sic], wrote Allmusic. Songs for this album were compiled from four different UK releases. Included were the five remaining tracks from the group's second British LP With the Beatles. Those songs were left off the previous Capitol album Meet the Beatles!. Also included were "Thank You Girl" (the B-side to the British single "From Me to You"), the single "She Loves You" / "I'll Get You", "You Can't Do That" from the A Hard Day's Night soundtrack LP in the UK, and two new songs, "Long Tall Sally" and "I Call Your Name," both released a month later in the UK on the Long Tall Sally EP. Also, the Capitol Records engineers, headed by record executive Dave Dexter, Jr, added a lot of echo and reverb to give the music more of a "live" feel. This is much more noticeable on the With the Beatles tracks, as they were recorded in two-track stereo. Exceptional is the inclusion of the stereo version of "Thank You Girl," as The Beatles' Second Album featured the only true stereo version of the song released on any US or UK album for over 40 years, until the same stereo version of the song (but with no echo added this time) was released on the 2009 remastered edition of Past Masters (The Beatles' Second Album stereo version of "Thank You Girl" was also included on The Beatles Beat, a German compilation release). Since all the echo added, this version remains a bit of a rarity. For its American-album debut in mono, Capitol took this stereo version and transferred it into a two-to-one stereo-to-mono mixdown for the mono album release, thus creating an alternative mono mix of the song. The stereo version of "Money" also underwent the same two-to-one stereo-to-mono mixdown for this album, thus creating another alternative mono mix. In the mono version of "I Call Your Name", the cowbell comes in at the very beginning of the song, whereas in the stereo version it comes in after the beginning of the vocal. Harrison's opening 12-string guitar phrase is also different between the mono and stereo versions. In "Long Tall Sally", the stereo version has echo while the mono version is lacking it. "You Can't Do That" is a different mono mix to the one released on the British album A Hard Day's Night for unknown reasons. Mark Lewisohn says that an alternative mono mix was sent by mistake instead of the UK master. This album was also released in the US on 8-track cartridge in 1967, and reel to reel tape and cassette in 1969. In 2004 this album was re-released for the first time on CD as part of The Capitol Albums, Volume 1 box set and was issued in a miniature cardboard replica of the original album sleeve.

Photobucket



01- Roll Over, Beethoven
02- Thank You Girl
03- You Really Got a Hold on Me
04- Devil in Her Heart
05- Money
06- You Can't Do That
07- Long Tall Sally
08- I Call Your Name
09- Please Mr. Postman
10- I'll Get You
11- She Loves You

· "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" LP recording sessions

First Paris at EMI Pathé studios, then London at Abbey Road, and finally the whole world...

Photobucket



01: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take 1]
02: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take 2]
03: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take 7]
04: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take 9]
05: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take 10]
06: Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand [Take xx]
07: Sie Liebt Dich [Take xx]
08: Can't Buy Me Love [Take 1]
09: Can't Buy Me Love [Take 2]
10: Can't Buy Me Love [Take 3]
11: Can't Buy Me Love [Take 4]
12: You Can't Do That [Take 6]
13: You Can't Do That [Take 9]
14: Can't Buy Me Love [Take 4 - RM1]
15: And I Love Her [Unknown Take]
16: And I Love Her [Take 2]
17: I Should Have Known Better [Take 8]
18: I Should Have Known Better [Take 11]
19: I Should Have Known Better [Take 22 – RM1]
20: And I Love Her [Take 11]
21: And I Love Her [Take 21 – RM1]
22: And I Love Her [Take 21 – RS1 - Frags.]
23: Tell Me Why [Take 2]
24: Tell Me Why [Take 4]
25: Tell Me Why [Take 8 – RM1]
26: If I Fell [Unknown Take]
27: If I Fell [Take 15 – RM1]
28: If I Fell [Take 15 – Lead guitar + vocals]
29: I’m Happy Just to Dance with You [Take 4 – RM1]
30: I Call Your Name [Studio chat]
31: Train Music
32: A Hard Day's Night [Take 1]
33: A Hard Day's Night [Take 2]
34: A Hard Day's Night [Take 3]
35: A Hard Day's Night [Take 4]
36: A Hard Day's Night [Take 5]
37: A Hard Day's Night [Take 6]
38: A Hard Day's Night [Take 7]
39: A Hard Day's Night [Take 8]
40: A Hard Day's Night [Take 9]
41: A Hard Day's Night [Overdubs onto Take 9]
42: A Hard Day's Night [RM1]
43: A Hard Day's Night [RS1]
44: I'll Be Back [Take 2]
45: I'll Be Back [Take 3]
46: I'll Be Back [Take 12]
47: I'll Be Back [Take 13]
48: I'll Be Back [Take 14]
49: I'll Be Back [Take 15]
50: Anytime at All [Take 11]
51: You Know What To Do [demo take 1]
52: No Reply [demo take 1]

Bonus Tracks:
53-58: A Hard Day's Night [Monitor mixes - Takes 1-6]
59: A Hard Day's Night [Rough mono pre-mix]
60: A Hard Day's Night [Rough stereo pre-mix]

sábado, 16 de febrero de 2013

· "CON LOS BEATLES" (With The Beatles Argentinian LP)

Recording first published:
Mono, 7 February 1964
Stereo, June 1972

 photo LP2S-1-2_zps3b83d86e.jpg



· "POR FAVOR, YO" (Please Please Me Argentinian LP)

Recording first published:
Mono, 7 February 1964
Stereo, April 1972

 photo LP1S-1_zps07d38fc5.jpg



· "MEET THE BEATLES!" - The Beatles USA 1964

Meet The Beatles! was the second Beatles' album released in the United States, despite the "first album" claim on its cover. Released on 20 January 1964, it was the first Capitol Records Beatles' album, issued in both mono and stereo. Capitol is a sister company to Parlophone, the Beatles' British label, and both are subsidiaries of EMI. Ten days prior to the release of Meet the Beatles!, Chicago's Vee-Jay Records released The Beatles' first album, Introducing... The Beatles, which had been delayed for release from the previous summer. Perhaps as a result of the Vee-Jay release, Liberty Music Shops advertised in the New York Times of 12 January 1964 that Meet The Beatles! was available for purchase, an ad not authorized by Capitol. The cover featured Robert Freeman's portrait that was used for the U.K. With The Beatles release with a tinted blue hue added to the original, stark black-and-white photograph. Meet The Beatles! reached the number one spot on Billboard album charts starting on February 15th, 1964. It remained at number one for an impressive 11 weeks before being replaced by The Beatles' Second Album; the first time that an artist replaced itself at the number one album position. In 2003, Meet The Beatles! was ranked number 59 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In 2004, the album was released on CD in stereo and mono as part of The Capitol Albums, Volume 1 box set.

Photobucket



01- I Want to Hold Your Hand
02- I Saw Her Standing There
03- This Boy
04- It Won't Be Long
05- All I've Got to Do
06- All My Loving
07- Don't Bother Me
08- Little Child
09- Till There Was You
10- Hold Me Tight
11- I Wanna Be Your Man
12- Not a Second Time

· "INTRODUCING THE BEATLES" - The Beatles USA 1964

Introducing... The Beatles is the first Beatles album in the United States. Originally scheduled for a July 1963 release, the LP finally came out on 10 January 1964, mere days before Capitol's Meet The Beatles!. It was the subject of much legal wrangling, but ultimately, Vee-Jay Records was permitted to sell the album until the fall of 1964, by which time it had sold more than 1.3 million copies. When it issued the "Please Please Me" single in the United States, Vee-Jay Records signed a licensing agreement with Transglobal, an EMI affiliate that worked to place foreign masters with U.S. record labels, giving it the right of first refusal on Beatles records for five years. As part of that agreement, Vee-Jay planned to release the UK Please Please Me album in the U.S., and received copies of the mono and stereo master tapes in late April or early May of 1963. Originally, Vee-Jay considered releasing the album exactly as it appeared in England. A surviving acetate made by Universal Recording Corporation of Chicago, probably in May 1963, contains all 14 songs in the same order as on the UK album, with the title still listed as Please Please Me. But in keeping with the American norm of a 12-song album, Vee-Jay chose instead to delete the songs "Please Please Me" and "Ask Me Why" and change the album's title to Introducing... The Beatles. Also, the engineer at Universal in Chicago thought that Paul McCartney's count-in at the start of "I Saw Her Standing There" was extraneous rather than intentionally placed there, so he snipped the "one, two, three" from Vee-Jay's mono and stereo masters. Except for those deletions, the order and contents of the album were untouched, resulting in a U.S. album that bore the closest resemblance to a British Beatles LP until Capitol’s Revolver in 1966. Preparations for the LP's release continued in late June and early July 1963, including the manufacturing of masters and metal parts and the printing of 6,000 front covers. But, despite the claims of many older books that Introducing The Beatles was first released on 22 July 1963 no paper trail exists to suggest that the album was released at any time in 1963. After a management shake-up at the label, which included the resignation of company president Ewart Abner after he used company funds to cover gambling debts, Vee-Jay canceled Introducing The Beatles. On 14 December 1963, Billboard magazine mentioned that Capitol Records planned an all-out promotional campaign for the Beatles in the United States. On 7 January 1964, Vee-Jay's board of directors met for the first time since that announcement, and it discussed the Beatles' material it had in the vault. Desperate for cash, the board decided to release IntroducingThe Beatles, even if it meant legal trouble in the future. Metal parts were already at Vee-Jay's three primary pressing plants, and 6,000 front covers were already printed. All of these were available on the market within days of the 10 January release date. On 16 January 1964, Introducing... The Beatles was finally released, but Vee-Jay was served with a restraining order stopping further distribution. Beechwood Music, Inc., Capitol Records' publishing subsidiary, owned the American publishing rights to "Love Me Do" and "P.S. I Love You", and because the two songs had not yet been officially released in the U.S., Beechwood refused to issue a license for Vee-Jay to release them. Approximately 80,000 copies of the album had been already released with the two songs on them, with only 2,000 or so in stereo. So in order to circumvent the restraining order, Vee-Jay quickly reconfigured the song list by removing "Love Me Do" and "P.S. I Love You" and replaced them with the previously deleted "Ask Me Why" and "Please Please Me”. The new versions were prepared in late January and began appearing in stores approximately 10 February 1964. Because of the initial restraining order, Introducing... The Beatles did not enter the Billboard album charts until one week after Meet the Beatles!. Once it did, it quickly rose to the #2 spot, where it stayed for nine straight weeks. It also peaked at #2 in Cash Box, and it got to #1 in Record World magazine. It is interesting to note that the song "I Saw Her Standing There", which was first released in the U.K. on the album Please Please Me, appeared in the U.S. on both the Vee-Jay album as well as Capitol's Meet The Beatles! LP. These two albums were initially issued almost simultaneously, marking the only time that 2 different Beatles albums, each from a different record label, were released at around the same time with one song appearing on both albums. In the other hand, the songs “Misery” and “There’s a Place” were first released by Capitol as part of the Rarities US album in 1980, and remained almost as unreleased songs since October 1964 when Vee Jay stopped distributing Introducing The Beatles. The rest of the songs were included in The Early Beatles, released by Capitol in mid-1965, which had very poor sales compared to the rest of the other Beatles records released back then, mainly due to the previous Vee Jay release of Introducing... The Beatles. Here’s the second version released on early February 1964 from the original Vee Jay stereo and mono LPs.

 Photobucket



01- I Saw Her Standing There
02- Misery
03- Anna [Go to Him]
04- Chains
05- Boys
06- Ask Me Why
07- Please Please Me
08- Baby It's You
09- Do You Want to Know a Secret?
10- A Taste of Honey
11- There's a Place
12- Twist & Shout

sábado, 9 de febrero de 2013

· "WITH THE BEATLES" UK LP - stereo

And this time the stereo version was released at the same time...


video


01- It Won't Be Long
02- All I've Got To Do
03- All My Loving
04- Don't Bother Me
05- Little Child
06- Till There Was You
07- Please Mister Postman
08- Roll Over Beethoven
09- Hold Me Tight
10- You Really Got A Hold On Me
11- I Wanna Be Your Man
12- Devil In Her Heart
13- Not A Second Time
14- Money [That's What I Want]



· "WITH THE BEATLES" UK LP - mono

With The Beatles is The Beatles' second UK album, recorded four months after the band's first album and released on 22 November 1963. The album features eight original compositions (including the first by George Harrison) and six covers, mostly of Motown and R&B hits. The LP had advance orders of a half million and sold another half million by September 1965, making it the second album to sell a million copies in the UK (the first being the South Pacific soundtrack). It stayed at the top of the charts for 21 weeks, displacing Please Please Me, so that the Beatles occupied the top spot for 51 consecutive weeks. It even reached number eleven in the "singles charts" (because at the time UK charts counted all records sold, regardless of format). In 2003, the album was ranked number 420 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Photobucket

video


01- It Won't Be Long
02- All I've Got To Do
03- All My Loving
04- Don't Bother Me
05- Little Child
06- Till There Was You
07- Please Mister Postman
08- Roll Over Beethoven
09- Hold Me Tight
10- You Really Got A Hold On Me
11- I Wanna Be Your Man
12- Devil In Her Heart
13- Not A Second Time
14- Money [That's What I Want]

· "WITH THE BEATLES" LP recording sessions

By mid 1963 the group started to record their second LP...

Photobucket



01- Piano + Drums instrumental
02- Please Mr. Postman (take 3)
03- Please Mr. Postman (take 9)
04- It Won't Be Long (take 7)
05- It Won't Be Long (take 10)
06- Messages to Australia
07- Hold Me Tight (rehearsal 1 - studio chat)
08- Hold Me Tight (remake - take 20)
09- Hold Me Tight (take 21 - [called 23])
10- Hold Me Tight (take 22)
11- Hold Me Tight (take 23)
12- Hold Me Tight (take 24)
13- Hold Me Tight (rehearsal 2)
14- Hold Me Tight (take 25)
15- Hold Me Tight (take 26 [plus fragment])
16- Hold Me Tight (take 27)
17- Hold Me Tight (take 28)
18- Hold Me Tight (take 29)
19- Don’t Bother Me (remake - take 10)
20- Don’t Bother Me (take 11)
21- Don’t Bother Me (take 12)
22- Don’t Bother Me (take 13)
23- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take 1)
24- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take 2)
25- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take 4)
26- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take 9)
27- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take x)
28- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take y)
29- I Want to Hold Your Hand (take 17)
30- I Want to Hold Your Hand (mono instrumental track)
31- I Want to Hold Your Hand (main vocals)
32- I Want to Hold Your Hand (basic track)
33- I Want to Hold Your Hand (overdubbings)
34- I Want to Hold Your Hand (basic track + overdubbings)
35- I Want to Hold Your Hand (1963 stereo mix)
36- This Boy (rehearsal)
37- This Boy (take 4)
38- This Boy (take 12)
39- This Boy (take 13)
40- This Boy (take 15)
41- This Boy (guitars)
42- This Boy (isolated vocals)
43- This Boy (RMRS 15)

miércoles, 6 de febrero de 2013

· "FROM ME TO YOU" single recording session

As it happened on March 5th, 1963, at Abbey Road studio nº 2...

Photobucket

video


01- From Me To You (take 1)
02- From Me To You (take 2)
03- From Me To You (take 3)
04- From Me To You (take 4)
05- From Me To You (take 5)
06- From Me To You (take 6)
07- From Me To You (take 7)
08- Thank You Girl (take 1)
09- Thank You Girl (take 2)
10- Thank You Girl (take 3)
11- Thank You Girl (take 4)
12- Thank You Girl (take 5)
13- Thank You Girl (take 6)
14- Thank You Girl (take 7)
15- Thank You Girl (take 8)
16- Thank You Girl (take 9)
17- Thank You Girl (take 10)
18- Thank You Girl (take 11)
19- Thank You Girl (take 12)
20- Thank You Girl (take 13)
21- One After 909 (take 1)
22- One After 909 (take 2)
23- One After 909 (take 3)
24- One After 909 (take 4)
25- One After 909 (take 5)
26- From Me To You (take 8)
27- From Me To You (takes 9 to 13)
28- From Me To You (stereo mix 1)
29- From Me To You (stereo mix 2)
30- From Me To You (1963 stereo mix 1+2)
31- Thank You Girl (stereo mix 1)
32- Thank You Girl (alternate mono mix from take 14)
33- Thank You Girl (alternate stereo mix)
34- One After 909 (mono mix)
35- One After 909 (stereo mix 1)
36- One After 909 (stereo mix 2)

Bonus Track:
37- She Loves You (unofficial "stereo" fake mix)

· "PLEASE PLEASE ME" UK LP - stereo

Due to the incredible public demand and neverending record sales, a stereo version was finally released in mid 1963...

Photobucket

video



01- I Saw Her Standing There
02- Misery
03- Anna (Go to Him)
04- Chains
05- Boys
06- Ask Me Why
07- Please Please Me
08- Love Me Do
09- PS I Love You
10- Baby It's You
11- Do You Want to Know a Secret?
12- A Taste of Honey
13- There's a Place
14- Twist & Shout

· "PLEASE PLEASE ME" UK LP - mono

Please Please Me is the first album recorded by The Beatles, rush-released on 22 March 1963 in the United Kingdom to capitalise on the success of singles "Please Please Me" (#2)[1] and "Love Me Do" (#17). Of the album's fourteen songs, eight were written by Lennon/McCartney, early evidence of what Rolling Stone later called "[their invention of] the self-contained rock band, writing their own hits and playing their own instruments." In 2003, the magazine ranked the album number 39 on its list of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Rolling Stone also placed two songs from the album on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time: #139, "I Saw Her Standing There", and #184, "Please Please Me". According to Allmusic, "Decades after its release, the album still sounds fresh," the covers are "impressive" and the originals "astonishing."

Photobucket

video


01- I Saw Her Standing There
02- Misery
03- Anna (Go to Him)
04- Chains
05- Boys
06- Ask Me Why
07- Please Please Me
08- Love Me Do
09- PS I Love You
10- Baby It's You
11- Do You Want to Know a Secret?
12- A Taste of Honey
13- There's a Place
14- Twist & Shout

domingo, 3 de febrero de 2013

· "PLEASE PLEASE ME" LP recording sessions (speed corrected)

Mainly the session from February 11st, 1963, but with some interesting extras...

 photo ppm-RS-cover_zps620a5d78.jpg



01- How Do You Do It? (unedited)
02- Please Please Me (demo)
03- There's a Place (take 1)
04- There’s a Place (take 2)
05- There’s a Place (take 3)
06- There’s a Place (take 4)
07- There’s a Place (take 5)
08- There’s a Place (take 6)
09- There’s a Place (take 7)
10- There’s a Place (take 8)
11- There’s a Place (take 9)
12- There’s a Place (take 10)
13- I Saw Her Standing There (take 1)
14- I Saw Her Standing There (take 2)
15- I Saw Her Standing There (take 3)
16- I Saw Her Standing There (take 4)
17- I Saw Her Standing There (take 5)
18- I Saw Her Standing There (take 6)
19- I Saw Her Standing There (take 7)
20- I Saw Her Standing There (take 8)
21- I Saw Her Standing There (take 9)
22- Do You Want to Know a Secret? (take 7)
23- Do You Want to Know a Secret? (take 8)
24- A Taste of Honey (take 5)
25- A Taste of Honey (take 6)
26- There’s a Place (take 11)
27- There’s a Place (take 12)
28- There’s a Place (take 13)
29- I Saw Her Standing There (take 10)
30- I Saw Her Standing There (take 11)
31- I Saw Her Standing There (take 12)
32- Misery (take 1)
33- Misery (take 2)
34- Misery (take 3)
35- Misery (take 4)
36- Misery (take 5)
37- Misery (take 6)
38- Misery (take 7)
39- Misery (take 8)
40- Twist & Shout (take 1)

· "THE DECCA TAPES (+ Bonus)" - The Beatles

For a start, let's hear what these four guys were doing at their very beggining as professionals...

1 January 1962 - Decca Studios, London
01- Hello Little Girl
02- Take Good Care of My Baby
03- Till There Was You
04- Love of The Loved
05- Crying, Waiting, Hoping
06- To Know Her is To Love Her
07- Bésame Mucho
08- Searching
09- Like Dreamers Do
10- Money [That's What I Want]
11- The Sheik Of Araby
12- Memphis, Tennessee
13- Sure To Fall
14- Three Cool Cats
15- September in the Rain

BONUS TRACKS:

7 March 1962 - BBC Playhouse Theatre, St. John's Road, Hulme, Manchester
16- Dream Baby
17- Memphis, Tennessee
18- Please Mr Postman

6 June 1962 - First Parlophone audition, Abbey Road studios, London
19- Bésame Mucho
20- Love Me Do

11 June 1962 - BBC Playhouse Theatre, Manchester
21- Bésame Mucho
22- Ask Me Why
23- A Picture of You

6 June 1962 - First Parlophone audition, Abbey Road studios, London
24- Bésame Mucho (Non looped fade)